I like the miracle of human consciousness.
fatwasandfanboys:

armor-and-calla-lilies:

fatwasandfanboys:

What Should We Call Girl Pain?
The starlets who posed for the July 2003 Vanity Fair “It’s Totally Raining Teens!” cover symbolized femininity, success, beauty, talent, youth and perfection. Average girls in the aughts didn’t have the accoutrements to be them, but they could watch them. Even better than watching them, average girls could read their books. The books based on their shows and movies heightened the fantasy. Average girls could be any of these starlets for $3.99 or $4.99. Average girls could be like them while they waited to grow up, not knowing they are already like them.
Five out of nine of the starlets featured on the July 2003 Vanity Fair cover have admitted to struggling with mental illness, making them more than Mary Sues. For Mary-Kate, her pain was called anorexia. For Mandy Moore and Evan Rachel Wood, depression. For Lindsay Lohan, addiction. For Amanda Bynes, “an eating disorder.”
Lindsay Lohan and Amanda Bynes, in particular, labored in Hollywood, as young, vulnerable girls, at the cost of self-love and self-awareness. Money and success couldn’t save them, ultimately, from the reality of illness and suffering. They both represent hurt and injury, and are mocked for it. When people are not cheaply waxing political about them, they are fetishized by gay white men and straight white men alike, mocked in the new lowest form of white male humor: White Girl Jokes.
Men never ask what they should call women’s pain, so they call us crazy. They call us crazy and they laugh at us. The same men who say women aren’t funny obviously do find women funny. They find women funny at the most inappropriate time: when we’re hurting. There is no sympathy, no empathy, for young women under the influence, on the verge of, or currently breaking down. Girl pain is titillating and amusing disaster porn. In Lindsay Lohan and Amanda Bynes’ case, their celebrity eclipses their humanity; they become the “willing victims” of the public abuse of men. Their inner turmoil, a spectacle, is a living punchline reaction gif, making us ask, “Where are their people?”
Lindsay and Amanda, we know, have no people. Amanda Bynes, in a recent tweet, stated, “I don’t speak to my parents anymore.” Lindsay has always been people-less. We learned this, when Lindsay released “Confessions of a Broken Heart (Daughter To Father).” Amy Poehler and Tina Fey tried to be Lindsay’s people, when they staged an intervention in 2005. Their efforts failed.
We watched Britney Spears struggle in the spotlight from 2006-2008, until her parents intervened, like good people should, rescuing their daughter from her very public nightmare, a nightmare exacerbated by men like Sam Lutfi and Perez Hilton. We watched Demi Lovato, during her tour with the Jonas Brothers, punch a back-up dancer. Like Britney, Demi’s support system— her people— intervened. Demi began her treatment at Timberline Knolls. It was there, at Timberline Knolls, that Demi learned what to call her hurt and injury and girl pain: bipolar disorder, bulimia, self-medication, cutting, etc. Her girl pain inspired her last album, Unbroken, the most Lohan-esque song from the album being “For the Love a Daughter.” Britney is older than the girls on the July 2003 Vanity Fair cover, Demi is younger, but their girl pain is the same.
The girls on the Vanity Fair cover all seem to express a vulnerability and winking stoicism. They seem aware of the fact that they were corseted and boxed in— as the clothes, the color and the cover suggest— but not weak. Amanda and Lindsay, both on the sides, are not holding onto any of the other girls. Instead, they grasp the white structure.
What should we call girl pain?

I know I reblog this all the time, but its one of my favorite things to reread. There are a few articles I reread when I feel stressed or sad or discomforted. This is one.

Thank you, love.

fatwasandfanboys:

armor-and-calla-lilies:

fatwasandfanboys:

What Should We Call Girl Pain?

The starlets who posed for the July 2003 Vanity Fair “It’s Totally Raining Teens!” cover symbolized femininity, success, beauty, talent, youth and perfection. Average girls in the aughts didn’t have the accoutrements to be them, but they could watch them. Even better than watching them, average girls could read their books. The books based on their shows and movies heightened the fantasy. Average girls could be any of these starlets for $3.99 or $4.99. Average girls could be like them while they waited to grow up, not knowing they are already like them.

Five out of nine of the starlets featured on the July 2003 Vanity Fair cover have admitted to struggling with mental illness, making them more than Mary Sues. For Mary-Kate, her pain was called anorexia. For Mandy Moore and Evan Rachel Wood, depression. For Lindsay Lohan, addiction. For Amanda Bynes, “an eating disorder.”

Lindsay Lohan and Amanda Bynes, in particular, labored in Hollywood, as young, vulnerable girls, at the cost of self-love and self-awareness. Money and success couldn’t save them, ultimately, from the reality of illness and suffering. They both represent hurt and injury, and are mocked for it. When people are not cheaply waxing political about them, they are fetishized by gay white men and straight white men alike, mocked in the new lowest form of white male humor: White Girl Jokes.

Men never ask what they should call women’s pain, so they call us crazy. They call us crazy and they laugh at us. The same men who say women aren’t funny obviously do find women funny. They find women funny at the most inappropriate time: when we’re hurting. There is no sympathy, no empathy, for young women under the influence, on the verge of, or currently breaking down. Girl pain is titillating and amusing disaster porn. In Lindsay Lohan and Amanda Bynes’ case, their celebrity eclipses their humanity; they become the “willing victims” of the public abuse of men. Their inner turmoil, a spectacle, is a living punchline reaction gif, making us ask, “Where are their people?”

Lindsay and Amanda, we know, have no people. Amanda Bynes, in a recent tweet, stated, “I don’t speak to my parents anymore.” Lindsay has always been people-less. We learned this, when Lindsay released “Confessions of a Broken Heart (Daughter To Father).” Amy Poehler and Tina Fey tried to be Lindsay’s people, when they staged an intervention in 2005. Their efforts failed.

We watched Britney Spears struggle in the spotlight from 2006-2008, until her parents intervened, like good people should, rescuing their daughter from her very public nightmare, a nightmare exacerbated by men like Sam Lutfi and Perez Hilton. We watched Demi Lovato, during her tour with the Jonas Brothers, punch a back-up dancer. Like Britney, Demi’s support system— her people— intervened. Demi began her treatment at Timberline Knolls. It was there, at Timberline Knolls, that Demi learned what to call her hurt and injury and girl pain: bipolar disorder, bulimia, self-medication, cutting, etc. Her girl pain inspired her last album, Unbroken, the most Lohan-esque song from the album being “For the Love a Daughter.” Britney is older than the girls on the July 2003 Vanity Fair cover, Demi is younger, but their girl pain is the same.

The girls on the Vanity Fair cover all seem to express a vulnerability and winking stoicism. They seem aware of the fact that they were corseted and boxed in— as the clothes, the color and the cover suggest— but not weak. Amanda and Lindsay, both on the sides, are not holding onto any of the other girls. Instead, they grasp the white structure.

What should we call girl pain?

I know I reblog this all the time, but its one of my favorite things to reread. There are a few articles I reread when I feel stressed or sad or discomforted. This is one.

Thank you, love.

jessr:

Excited I got to read one of my poems as part of Spoken & Sung II at the Lilypad in Cambridge, MA! Check out the rest of the performers at the S&S channel!

What if yesterday is secretly in love with today, but can only watch as today falls for tomorrow over and over again.
Josh Elbaum “Things That Keep Me Up At Night” (via memorizetheirfaces)

turkeyinacan:

diggingaditch:

turkeyinacan:

shoutout to people working weekends and overnights and overtime, people working in hospitality and retail and food service, who are sacrificing time with their loved ones, so fuckers with weekday desk jobs get to live comfortably with the amenities we provide while simultaneously shitting all over us for not getting “real jobs”

This literally does not happen

You literally have no concept of the grown-up world.

A friend of mine asked me recently, was I gonna go see the new Batman movie with him. But I don’t respect the concept of Batman because of what I understand about politics now. I’mma lay it out for you: rich dude owns a corporation with state of the art equipment, and he uses this to beat up on street level crime. He doesn’t mess with the industrialists, or the super capitalists, or the Murdochs, or the Trumps. He really just fucks with the person that’s on the corner. Batman is a conservative’s wet dream. Fuck Batman.
Reginald D. Hunter  (via pussy-envy (via dadcamp)

thegreenlentil:

date a boy who reads. date a boy who steals your book and gives it back annotated instead of borrowing it like a normal person. date a boy whose uncle pushes him into a lake. date a boy who can’t go two seconds without making a sarcastic comment. date jess. i guess. for some reason. it’s too early in the arc for me to understand why you would do that, rory gilmore. 

rubyetc:

also with shutting cupboards and doors correctly, being able to lob stuff into the laundry basket, imaginary races with people in the street, if an atm gives me two tens or a twenty..

rubyetc:

also with shutting cupboards and doors correctly, being able to lob stuff into the laundry basket, imaginary races with people in the street, if an atm gives me two tens or a twenty..

only took a month but we do in fact have a mouse and i have trapped it in my closet and now i can never go in there again/goodbye narnia

mens-frights-activist:

partspookeleton:

happy birthday to my soulmate mens-frights-activist. you’re my favourite piece of garbage and i’ll follow you to the end of the line. because i can black mail you with all the amazing photos i have of you. i love you.

i’m gonna vomit in your pillowcase tonight sleep well motherfucker

1) i have friends that make me laugh so hard i pee myself a little

2) eight hour shift today and i think i inhaled too many sanitizer fumes

3) if you believe in good vibes could you please send some over here, thank you much much a lot

deirdrerose:

happened upon one of my favourite humans blue-raft in her natural habitat as starbucks barista. made my day (and my drink hah) but also i just want to say i frikkin love her and she is the jess rizcoolest

image

DR. DRE I LUV YOU FOREVER :’)

He lit a cigarette. His glass of whiskey lit a cigarette. “I can only truly love my dead best friend,” he said, “but not in a gay way. Women wouldn’t understand. They’re too gay.” Both of the cigarettes agreed.
from Mallory Ortberg’s hilarious “Male Novelist Jokes.”  (via internetexplorers)
cwjanethevirgin:

She wasn’t expecting this. Don’t miss the series premiere of Jane The Virgin TONIGHT at 9/8c on The CW! 

this is a horrible idea for a tv show unless they subvert your expectations for how horrible it is and it’s secretly a show that smashes the concept of virginity but i doubt that’s what it is and if it’s not then hey cool how many young girls are watching this instead of buffy. or even like paint drying

cwjanethevirgin:

She wasn’t expecting this. Don’t miss the series premiere of Jane The Virgin TONIGHT at 9/8c on The CW! 

this is a horrible idea for a tv show unless they subvert your expectations for how horrible it is and it’s secretly a show that smashes the concept of virginity but i doubt that’s what it is and if it’s not then hey cool how many young girls are watching this instead of buffy. or even like paint drying

That random person you met online and now is a big part of your life
im sorry if this is creepy but i feel like every time i come in here your lipstick is on point. it’s fantastic. wow
my new favorite customer :’)